facts-i-just-made-up:

Connect Four was originally played with the skulls of one’s enemies.

facts-i-just-made-up:

Connect Four was originally played with the skulls of one’s enemies.

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No, one does not. 

No, one does not. 

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Clouds rolling in over Lake Michigan #Milwaukee

Clouds rolling in over Lake Michigan #Milwaukee

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Waiting for summer.

Waiting for summer.

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More Calatrava pics from #Milwaukee

More Calatrava pics from #Milwaukee

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Lines. #Calatrava

Lines. #Calatrava

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A little slice of #Milwaukee.

A little slice of #Milwaukee.

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Wings.

Wings.

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Spring at the Calatrava. Wings up. #Milwaukee

Spring at the Calatrava. Wings up. #Milwaukee

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Nerds 1, Super Bowl 0: #Lightsout as a site of negotiation

When the lights went out in the Superdome for Superbowl XLVII, Twitter erupted. During the blackout, users generated a staggering 285,000 tweets per minute—more than at any other point during the game. An analysis of tweets containing the #LightsOut hashtag revealed an interested trend: Pop culture references. Interestingly, these tweets renegotiate the Super Bowl narrative as a form of storytelling—specific to their referenced pop culture text—under the shared theme of a hashtag. Take for example the tweet: “@ArryPottah: The power went out at the Super Bowl. Too bad you Muggles don’t have Lumos. #lightsout #poweroutage” This tweet uses the Harry Potter pejorative term for non-magical humans “Muggles” along with “Lumos,” the name of a spell, to appropriate the Super Bowl narrative into a Potter storyline. Similar tactics were displayed across the tweets that made references to pop culture titles (Batman, Hunger Games, etc.). Thus #lightsout allowed potentially marginalized “Geek culture” communities to appropriate the Super Bowl narrative away from the classic machismo, consumerist rhetoric to one of their own. 

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I wasn’t intending to do another Walking Dead post, but I just have to. Please bear with me. I am an avid reader and sometime participant in TWD fan forums. This last episode focused heavily on the female character Michonne (picture above). 
I saw in one of the forums a poster thanking the writers of the episode for “softening up Michonne.” Although at this point in the series, Michonne hasn’t been used to her full potential, she is one of the female characters who still has a strong presence. Her character oozes mystique and danger and her ninja-like qualities are the frequent source of discussion on boards. No one wants to tangle with Michonne. I suppose that’s why I found the comments so jarring. “Softening up” Michonne seems contrary to her entire existence, but then we are back to the same point as last week, but from a different angle: Female characters on TV must conform to gender norms or they run the risk of alienating viewers. 
To be fair, I think the author of the comment was more or less speaking towards the character development we finally got to see, but his/her choice of words seemed revealing.

I wasn’t intending to do another Walking Dead post, but I just have to. Please bear with me. I am an avid reader and sometime participant in TWD fan forums. This last episode focused heavily on the female character Michonne (picture above). 

I saw in one of the forums a poster thanking the writers of the episode for “softening up Michonne.” Although at this point in the series, Michonne hasn’t been used to her full potential, she is one of the female characters who still has a strong presence. Her character oozes mystique and danger and her ninja-like qualities are the frequent source of discussion on boards. No one wants to tangle with Michonne. I suppose that’s why I found the comments so jarring. “Softening up” Michonne seems contrary to her entire existence, but then we are back to the same point as last week, but from a different angle: Female characters on TV must conform to gender norms or they run the risk of alienating viewers. 

To be fair, I think the author of the comment was more or less speaking towards the character development we finally got to see, but his/her choice of words seemed revealing.

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You are looking at two images of the same character. The Walking Dead’s Andrea is one of the most hated characters on the show. As a fan of the comic this is especially difficult to stomach. Nevertheless, a comparison of the pictures lends insight into why TV Andrea is so despised: She can’t hold a candle to comic book Andrea.

In both story lines, Andrea becomes an expert shot. The drawing above places Andrea in a power stance. The determined look on her face shows that she means business. Her clothes are not revealing, and appear functional in her task. Her hair is pulled back, out of her eyes, also functional. In short, Andrea looks like a badass.

TV Andrea somehow manages to have sexy hair, no matter what the situation, even when it’s filthy as in this picture. The shirt hanging off her shoulder creates a vulnerability and sexuality in her appearance that are just not there in the comic Andrea. TV Andrea is placed at an angle and is looking towards the camera, which I feel, lends to the vulnerability she seems to be presenting.

To avoid any spoilers, I will just say that the depictions in these images represent how the respective characters are developed. It’s unfortunate the strongest comic book women (Andrea, Michonne) are watered down to better fit stereotypes on TV.

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